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Radiology

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The Division of Pediatric Radiology at NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital provides a variety of diagnostic radiology services for our pediatric patients, including:

X-ray
An X-ray is a basic diagnostic test using invisible electromagnetic energy beams to produce images of internal tissues, bones and organs onto film.

Computed Tomography Scan (CT or CAT scan)
A CT scan is a diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of X-rays and computer technology to produce cross-sectional images (often called slices), both horizontally and vertically, of the body. Our state-of-the-art 64-slice CT scanner represents the latest in imaging technology, offering unparalleled resolution and quick scanning times.

A CT scan shows detailed images of any part of the body, including the bones, muscles, fat, and organs. CT scans are more detailed than general X-rays. Your child lies on a bed that moves into a doughnut shaped machine that takes many pictures of different areas of the body. Because the machine is noisy, and because your child may need to lie still for a period of time, sedation might be recommended for the procedure.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
An MRI is a diagnostic procedure that uses a combination of large magnets, radiofrequencies and a computer to produce detailed images of organs and structures within the body. MRI does not use X-rays.

The test is painless and does not involve exposure to radiation. Because the MRI scanner is like a tunnel, some children may feel claustrophobic or unable to hold still during the test. In these instances, they may receive medication to help them relax or sleep.

The MRI room offers noise-canceling technology and music to help your child relax, as well as a two-way audio system so your child and the clinician can communicate throughout the exam and constant closed-circuit TV supervision for complete patient safety.

Lower GI (Gastrointestinal) Series
A lower GI series is a procedure that examines the rectum, the large intestine and the lower part of the small intestine. A fluid called barium (a metallic, chemical, chalky liquid used to coat the inside of organs so that they will show up on an X-ray) is given by enema. An X-ray of the abdomen reveals strictures (narrowed areas), obstructions (blockages) and other problems.

Upper GI (Gastrointestinal) Series
An upper GI series is a diagnostic test that examines the organs of the upper part of the digestive system: the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (the first section of the small intestine). Your child swallows a fluid called barium (a metallic, chalky, liquid used to coat the inside of organs so that they will show up on an X-ray). X-rays are then taken to evaluate the digestive organs.

Ultrasound
An ultrasound is a diagnostic imaging technique that uses high-frequency sound waves and a computer to create images of blood vessels, tissues, and organs. Ultrasounds are used to view internal organs as they function and to assess blood flow through various vessels. Gel is applied to the area of the body being studied, such as the abdomen, and a wand called a transducer is placed on the skin. The transducer sends sound waves into the body that bounce off organs and return to the ultrasound machine, producing an image on the monitor. A picture or videotape of the test is also made so it can be reviewed in the future.

Angiography and Venography
These diagnostic imaging procedures are used to image and examine arteries and veins by employing a combination of X-rays and computer technology to produce cross-sectional images (often called slices), both horizontally and vertically, of the blood vessels.

Echocardiography
Echocardiograms use ultrasonic sound waves for diagnostic and treatment purposes in children with primary or secondary heart problems. NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital offers cardiac ultrasound, fetal echocardiography, intraoperative echocardiography, intravascular echocardiography, and transesophageal echocardiography.

Nuclear Imaging (SPECT)
Single photon emission computed tomography, or SPECT, is a type of nuclear imaging that provides high-resolution three dimensional and whole-body imaging. This helps physicians evaluate the location of tumors and any changes in tumor size in children with cancer.

Fluoroscopy
Fluoroscopy is a radiology technique that allows still or moving images of internal organs to be viewed on a monitor or TV screen. It is an alternative to conventional X-rays.

Contact

Pediatric Radiology
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(212) 305-3320
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